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Andrew Farmiloe October 2016

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    Notes


    Matches 151 to 200 of 1,030

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     #   Notes   Linked to 
    151 Berthe held a card issued by the Swiss Consulate in Paris dated between these dates. Swiss law requires its nationals to inform the Swiss authorities of their residence when living abroad. However, her daughter Diana recollects that the family were living:
    in August 1925 at Nervi, near Genova, Italy;
    in October 1925 at 19 Walsestrasse, Zurich, Switzerland;
    in December 1925 at 3 via Hypolito D'Aste, Genova, Italy where her sister Yolande (Yolande Beekman qv) nearly died of double pneumonia. 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1434)
     
    152 Berthe held a card issued by the Swiss Consulate in Paris dated between these dates. Swiss law requires its nationals to inform the Swiss authorities of their residence when living abroad. However, her daughter Diana recollects that the family were living:
    in August 1925 at Nervi, near Genova, Italy;
    in October 1925 at 19 Walsestrasse, Zurich, Switzerland;
    in December 1925 at 3 via Hypolito D'Aste, Genova, Italy where her sister Yolande (Yolande Beekman qv) nearly died of double pneumonia. 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1660)
     
    153 Berthe must have endured many vicissitudes during her life. She could never marry the father of her children, Michelangelo Mercurio (qv) who had an estranged wife in Italy. During their life together for over 40 years, they lived in Switzerland, Italy, France and England, and moved addresses many times. They must have had many financial ups and downs, particularly around the time of Michelangelo's banking affair. Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1434)
     
    154 Berthe must have endured many vicissitudes during her life. She could never marry the father of her children, Michelangelo Mercurio (qv) who had an estranged wife in Italy. During their life together for over 40 years, they lived in Switzerland, Italy, France and England, and moved addresses many times. They must have had many financial ups and downs, particularly around the time of Michelangelo's banking affair. Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1660)
     
    155 Berthe must have returned to Paris from Milan as this address in Paris was given as Berthe's last address before arrival in the United Kingdom in her UK Certificate of Registration (qv). Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1434)
     
    156 Berthe must have returned to Paris from Milan as this address in Paris was given as Berthe's last address before arrival in the United Kingdom in her UK Certificate of Registration (qv). Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1660)
     
    157 Berthe registered with the Police on 12 August 1929 as required under the Aliens Order 1920. She was issued a certificate of registration on that date which records that she arrived in the United Kingdom on 4 April 1929. However she must have visited London before that as her Swiss Consular certificate issued in Milan (qv) bears a stamp dated 20 June 1928 by the Swiss Legation in London.
    The certificate shows her first address in London was 48 The Priors, East Heath Road, Hampstead. Later addresses recorded were 23 Knightsbridge Court, Sloane Street (28 February 1931), 43 Finchley Road, Swiss Cottage NW8 (?) (26 May 1933) and 6 Lissenden Mansions, Lissenden Gardens, Highgate Road NW5 (3 February 1938).
    The author believes Berthe remained at Lissenden Mansions until her death in 1956. 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1434)
     
    158 Berthe registered with the Police on 12 August 1929 as required under the Aliens Order 1920. She was issued a certificate of registration on that date which records that she arrived in the United Kingdom on 4 April 1929. However she must have visited london before that as her Swiss Consular certificate issued in Milan (qv) bears a stamp dated 20 june 1928 by the Swiss Legation in London.
    The certificate shows her first address in London was 48 The Priors, East Heath Roa, Hampstead.Later addresses recorded were 23 Knightsbridge Court, Sloane Street (28 February 1931), 43 Finchley Road, Swiss Cottage NW8 (?) (26 May 1933) and 6 Lissenden Mansions, Lissenden Gardens, Highgate Road NW5 (3 February 1938). 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1660)
     
    159 Berther held a registration card issued by the Swiss Consulate and dated between these dates. According to her daughter Diana's recollection, the family lived at the following addresses:
    1926: 31 via de Amicis, Milano
    7 September 1927: via Clemente Marsini, Lugano
    23 September 1927: via Moscava, Milano?
    ? 3 via Hypolito D'Aste, Genova 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1434)
     
    160 Berther held a registration card issued by the Swiss Consulate and dated between these dates. According to her daughter Diana's recollection, the family lived at the following addresses:
    1926: 31 via de Amicis, Milano
    7 September 1927: via Clemente Marsini, Lugano
    23 September 1927: via Moscava, Milano?
    ? 3 via Hypolito D'Aste, Genova 
    Unternahrer, Berthe Lydie (I1660)
     
    161 Between 1285 and 1886, the Corporation of London had the power (originally conferred by Royal Charter and later confirmed by Act of Parliament) to license brokers in all commodities. By the 19th century, the costs of becoming a broker caused growing resentment. Each broker had to pay an admission fee and an annual broker's rent, in each case £5 after 1817. As a guarantee of good behaviour, each broker also had to provide a broker's bond, increased from £500 to £1, 000 in 1817. After that year, each broker also had to provide two sureties, who each had to pledge £250 for the broker's good behaviour. In the later part of the century, increased pressure was exerted on Parliament by brokers which led first to the abolition of the broker's bond (London Broker's Relief Act, 1870) followed by the abolition with effect from 29 September 1886 of the broker's rent and the Corporation's entire jurisdiction over brokers (London Broker's Relief Act, 1884).

    WHH must have been involved in the run-up to the abolition of this legislation. The official records of the Corporation of London show that WHH was admitted as a sworn broker on 21 April 1880, his address being 51 Threadneedle Street. He signed the receipt for his admission certificate on 23 April. The Brokers' Rentals confirm WHH's place of business as 51 Threadneedle Street. He paid £5 for the annual rental from 1880 to 1886 when rents were abolished. The Stock Exchange's records of membership do not seem to include WHH's original application for election as a member, nor does there seem to be a resolution approving his membership in the minutes of the General Purposes Committee of the Stock Exchange. However, the minutes do record receipt of a notice from John Gibbs and William Henry Hart stating that they have entered into partnership under the style of John Gibbs and Hart. The records also contain WHH's application for re-election as a member for the year commencing 25 March 1881. His residence is given as South Beddington, Surrey and his office address as 51 Threadneedle Street E.C. His bankers were London & County Banking Co. Ltd. and the National Provincial Bank of England Ltd. 
    Hart, William Henry (I66)
     
    162 Birth calculated from stated age at death (72). Farmilo, Thomas (I1084)
     
    163 Birth date calculated from age at death (76). Farmilo, Lydia (I1078)
     
    164 Birth date calculated from age stated at death (51). Farmilo, Mary (I1083)
     
    165 Birth date calculated from age stated at death (69). Farmilo, Thomas (I1085)
     
    166 Birth date presumed from baptism. Meakin, Elizabeth (I13)
     
    167 Birth year estimated from age in 1841 census Farmiloe, John (I1647)
     
    168 Boaz is indexed under the spelling of Farmiloe with an "e" but the author believes this is the same individual as the Boaz Farmilo named as father iun the baptismal entry for Charles Farmilo FARMILO, Boaz (I294)
     
    169 born 1874
    married 1902 Hampstead
    died 1926 
    Rosslyn Smith, Herbert (I1003)
     
    170 Born 1874 Islington
    Married 1902 Hampstead
    Died 1941 Oxford 
    Farmiloe, Nora Evelyn (I60)
     
    171 born 1903
    married Allen Smith
    died 1972 
    Rosslyn Smith, Evelyn Audrey (I1004)
     
    172 born 1905
    married Sybil Brett 
    Rosslyn Smith, James (I1005)
     
    173 born 1910
    married Emily 
    Rosslyn Smith, Robert (I1006)
     
    174 born 1912
    married Beryl Barrett 
    Rosslyn Smith, John (I1007)
     
    175 Britain was unprepared. The army had only 45,000 men; only one tenth of the battle fleet could put out to sea. The government was concerned with the threat of invasion and the cost of the war. Martello Towers were constructed along the coast; the Militia was strengthened. By 1795, subsidies to allies were running into tens of millions of pounds. Taxation had to be substantially increased. A new tax on income was levied, at 2s in the pound. Farmiloe, William (I6)
     
    176 Buried at Highgate Cemetery - West cemetery: grave 4763/61: a "common" grave, ie no stone (see letter 11 July 1997). Farmiloe, William (I9)
     
    177 Charles Booth's Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People in London, undertaken between 1886 and 1903 was one of several surveys of working class life carried out in the 19th century. It is the only survey for which the original notes and data have survived and therefore provides a unique insight into the development of the philosophy and methodology of social investigation in the United Kingdom.

    The survey was published as Life and Labour of the People 2 vols (London: 1889) (title of Vol 2 reads Labour and Life of the People), Labour and Life of the People 2 vols & Appendix (London: 1889-1891 2nd ed.), Life and Labour of the People in London 9 vols & Maps (London: 1892-1897) and Life and Labour of the People in London 17 vols (London: Macmillan,1902-1903). However, Booth included in the published volumes only information that could be quantified, and which would not identify or embarrass any individual interviewee. For these reasons much of the vivid detail can only be traced through use of the original notebooks.
    The survey notes and data form a rich and varied resource for investigation into the social and economic history of late 19th century London. Living and working conditions, the lives and employment of women, organisation of trade and industry, the effects of national and international migration, leisure activities, and the religious life of the capital are all described in detail. The Booth collection held by the Archives Division of the British Library of Political and Economic Science (London School of Economics) contains 450 original notebooks from the survey 
    Farmiloe, George (I15)
     
    178 Charles Booth's Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People in London, undertaken between 1886 and 1903 was one of several surveys of working class life carried out in the 19th century. It is the only survey for which the original notes and data have survived and therefore provides a unique insight into the development of the philosophy and methodology of social investigation in the United Kingdom.

    The survey was published as Life and Labour of the People 2 vols (London: 1889) (title of Vol 2 reads Labour and Life of the People), Labour and Life of the People 2 vols & Appendix (London: 1889-1891 2nd ed.), Life and Labour of the People in London 9 vols & Maps (London: 1892-1897) and Life and Labour of the People in London 17 vols (London: Macmillan,1902-1903). However, Booth included in the published volumes only information that could be quantified, and which would not identify or embarrass any individual interviewee. For these reasons much of the vivid detail can only be traced through use of the original notebooks.
    The survey notes and data form a rich and varied resource for investigation into the social and economic history of late 19th century London. Living and working conditions, the lives and employment of women, organisation of trade and industry, the effects of national and international migration, leisure activities, and the religious life of the capital are all described in detail. The Booth collection held by the Archives Division of the British Library of Political and Economic Science (London School of Economics) contains 450 original notebooks from the survey 
    George Farmiloe & Sons (I1292)
     
    179 Charles Booth's Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People in London, undertaken between 1886 and 1903 was one of several surveys of working class life carried out in the 19th century. It is the only survey for which the original notes and data have survived and therefore provides a unique insight into the development of the philosophy and methodology of social investigation in the United Kingdom.

    The survey was published as Life and Labour of the People 2 vols (London: 1889) (title of Vol 2 reads Labour and Life of the People), Labour and Life of the People 2 vols & Appendix (London: 1889-1891 2nd ed.), Life and Labour of the People in London 9 vols & Maps (London: 1892-1897) and Life and Labour of the People in London 17 vols (London: Macmillan,1902-1903). However, Booth included in the published volumes only information that could be quantified, and which would not identify or embarrass any individual interviewee. For these reasons much of the vivid detail can only be traced through use of the original notebooks.
    The survey notes and data form a rich and varied resource for investigation into the social and economic history of late 19th century London. Living and working conditions, the lives and employment of women, organisation of trade and industry, the effects of national and international migration, leisure activities, and the religious life of the capital are all described in detail. The Booth collection held by the Archives Division of the British Library of Political and Economic Science (London School of Economics) contains 450 original notebooks from the survey
     
    T & W Farmiloe (I1301)
     
    180 checked by Carole Hartshorn Family F107
     
    181 Churchwardens' accounts show that in 1706 6s was paid to Wm Farmiloe for " Work and Tyle".
    The identity of this Wm Farmiloe is not proven. 
    FARMILOE, William (I824)
     
    182 Circumstantial evidence that her origin was Minchinhampton is provided in the correspondence between her second husband William Western and Wm Smith, solicitor of Nailsworth. Western, Anne (I3)
     
    183 Copy held Farmiloe, Howard Hatherall (I1324)
     
    184 Copy of Menu supplied by Douglas Farmiloe. Source (S33)
     
    185 Correct identity of father is not proved. Presumed to be an infant at deatrh due to mention of father in burial entry. ffARMyLOE, John (I836)
     
    186 Correct identity of father is not proven (mother's name not mentioned in baptismal entry). LDS entries assumed to relate. Another FamilySearch entry under "Joseph FARMALOE" has been merged into this person.
     
    FARMILOE, Joseph (I400)
     
    187 Correct identity of father is not proven. FARMILOE, William (I830)
     
    188 Corresponded with Mrs Hughes: my letter 12/12/99
    Mrs Hughes' 3xggmother was Sarah White nee Brooks born 25 Aug 1839 :@ Old Sodbury to Thomas Brooke and Sarah Brooke nee Farmilo. 
    FARMILO, Cornelius (I264)
     
    189 Craig Murray, GenesReunited 26/01/2007:
    Kate''s aunt, Elizabeth is my gg grandmother. I''d only been able to track down my Cullis connection late last year so am still finding and confirming the various rellies.I show Kate''s parents as Charles Cullis and Sarah A Forth most likely from a marriage in Chippenham district in 1853.

     
    Cullis, Kate Selina (I907)
     
    190 Daily Telegraph: Hazel Farmiloe peacefully on Wednesday 1st February 2012 at Queen Alexandra Hospital, Hants. Much loved and loving wife to Leslie, devoted mother to Jonathan and Guy, adored Grannie to Katie, Edward and Toby. She will be missed by all her family and many friends. Thanksgiving Service to be held at 3.30 pm on 23rd February 2012 at Chichester Crematorium, Westhampnett Road, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 7UH. Family flowers only. Douglas-Smith, Hazel (I1249)
     
    191 Daniel is recorded as son of "Elizabeth" but believed "Betty" is same person. See Beynon list for more information. There were two younger daughters: Margaret and Amelia. FARMILO, Daniel (I310)
     
    192 Date and place of birth presumed from baptism. FARMILOE, Joseph (I400)
     
    193 Date and place of death presumed from burial. Latham, Ann (I832)
     
    194 Date assumed from baptism. Western, Anne (I3)
     
    195 Date estimated from 1851 Census entry (see husband). Mary Ann (I272)
     
    196 Date estimated from information in 1851 Census. FARMILOE, Charles (I273)
     
    197 Date has been changed to new style (date in register is 1724). This seems to be the correct entry although there is a two year age discrepancy between this date and the age given in the marriage allegation (copy held). Farmiloe, William (I1)
     
    198 Date inferred from burial. Western, Anne (I3)
     
    199 Date of birth calculated from noteof age at death. Farmilo, Thomas (I1073)
     
    200 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Farmiloe, B.J.S. (I1640)
     

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